Categories
Beyond Meat Impossible Foods Net News

Impossible Foods CEO slams ‘the most destructive technology on Earth by far’

Impossible Foods CEO slams ‘the most destructive technology on Earth by far’

Daniel Howley

Technology Editor

January 8, 2020, 1:27 PM EST

Impossible Foods unveils plant-based pork and sausage

Impossible Foods CEO Pat Brown is bringing the heat to CES 2020 in Las Vegas, America’s biggest consumer tech trade show. The head of the plant-based meat company not only debuted two new products, a ground pork and pork sausage alternative, but slammed the meat industry in an interview with Yahoo Finance, calling it “the most destructive technology on Earth by far.”

The company’s ultimate goal is to completely replace animals as a form of food by 2035.

Impossible Foods already offers a beef alternative in its Impossible Burger, which uses plants and includes a soy-based heme protein, which gives the burger the faux blood that makes it “bleed.”

The new sausage offering goes on sale in January at 139 Burger King locations in various test markets across the U.S. There’s no word on availability for the ground pork offering just yet.

Impossible’s latest move comes as the fake meat wars continue to heat up. The company’s biggest competitor, Beyond Meat (BYND), went public in 2019 and saw its stock skyrocket from its IPO price of $25 all the way to $234 in July, before settling back down to $83.89 on Tuesday.

On Tuesday, Impossible told Reuters it’s no longer seeking a deal to supply McDonald’s (MCD) with its Impossible burger due to supply constraints. Beyond Meat’s shares jumped on the news.

Holding the meat industry’s feet to the fire

With beef and pork alternatives already on the table, Brown says that chicken and turkey alternatives, as well as other plant-based meat options, are on the way.

Impossible Foods CEO Pat Brown holds up an Impossible Burger 2.0, the new and improved version of the company’s plant-based vegan burger that tastes like real beef, at a press event during CES 2019 in Las Vegas, Nevada on January 7, 2019. – (Photo by Robyn Beck / AFP)

“Again the thing that you just have to remember to anticipate everything Impossible is going to do is that our intention is to completely replace animals as a food production technology, the most destructive technology on Earth by far,” Brown said. “And that means that any product that we’re currently producing using animals, Impossible Foods is already working on, and will commercialize a plant-based, a better, more delicious, more affordable, vastly more sustainable version of that product.”

Brown’s claims of the impact of the meat industry on the environment aren’t unfounded. There have been several studies linking meat to everything from climate change to antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Which is why, he says, Impossible Foods is so important.

Beyond Meat offers a similar reason for its products’ existence, naming the meat industry’s impact on the environment as an example of why plant-based alternatives are necessary.

“It’s a very important problem to solve,” Brown said. “Pork production is actually a big public health issue, because there are actually more antibiotics fed to pork, to pigs, than to all humans. It’s a major source of antibiotic-resistant pathogens.”

While there’s been a lot of discussion about the meat industry’s impact on climate change through methane produced by farm animals, Brown says Impossible Foods is focusing on more than just how the climate itself is affected.

“Of course, it’s not just about climate, it’s about global biodiversity, it’s about water resources, water pollution, and so forth,” Brown said. The nutritional impact of plant-based meat alternatives has also been a major sticking point for the companies. And while they have a lower amount of saturated fat than their animal-based counterparts, plant-based burgers like Impossible’s do have more sodium than beef.

But Impossible’s pork products won’t help anyone if they don’t taste good. Fortunately, for Brown, after I tried a soft-shell corn taco with the company’s ground pork offering, I can report that the taste of Impossible Foods’ faux pork is as close to the real thing as you can get.

It’s not dry, and even browns similar to pork. If I didn’t know it was plant-based, I wouldn’t have been able to tell the difference. In our own Yahoo Finance taste test last fall, Impossible’s burger outshined Beyond’s by a slim margin.

As for the pork, we’ll just have to wait and see how the rest of the world feels…

Source: Impossible Foods CEO slams ‘the most destructive technology on Earth by far’






Categories
Beyond Meat Bolthouse Farms BRAGG LIVE FOODS IMAGINE VEGAN ORGANIC BROTH TEST PRODUCT RECIPES

IMAGINE CARROT BROWN GRAVY


IMAGINE CARROT BROWN GRAVY

I tried this gravy over Beyond Italian Sausage – and it was made for it! What a surprise! A perfect fit.

Makes 3 cups

Categories
Beyond Meat DELALLO FOODS Lightlife Plant Meats REX-GOLIATH wine TEST PRODUCT RECIPES V-8 VEGETABLE JUICE

Souped Up DELLALO Sauce

SOUPED UP DELLALO SAUCE

DELALLO Roasted Garlic Sauce with Chardonnay wine and V-8 juice used as extenders. Served with a mushroom, pepper, onion and tomato saute. Served over fettucini and topped with a BEYOND and LIGHTLIFE beef and sausage crumble!

Serves 4-6

Categories
Beyond Meat Gardein Meatless Meats Impossible Foods Net News

Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods have a new foe in the plant-based burger wars: the Ultimate Burger

Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods have a new foe in the plant-based burger wars: the Ultimate Burger

Brian Sozzi

It’s ultimately not meat. But the Conagra Brands-owned Gardein brand hopes its new plant-based Ultimate Burger wins over Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods loyalists in 2020.

Gardein, acquired in Conagra’s 2018 acquisition of Pinnacle Foods, will release the next iteration of the Ultimate Burger in January. The burger is a mixture of soy and pea protein, assorted spices and canola oil. It will join several other plant-based Gardein products currently on the market, such as fishless fish and meatless meatballs (using the same proteins). The “Ultimate” label will also be used on a line of spicy sausage and hot dogs.

Wrapped in sleek brown packaging, the Ultimate Burger scores big on overall value: a six-pack of burgers will go for $11.99. A two-pack of Beyond Meat burgers could set you back about $5.99.

The notorious five pound Impossible Foods “brick” can go for upwards of $250.

A Conagra spokesperson says the Ultimate Burger will quickly reach supermarkets and restaurants given its extensive network of ingredient suppliers.

Ultimate burgerIt’s not surprising to see Conagra go all-in on plant-based foods. Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods have created a surging market, fueled by great-tasting plant-based products and new deals at restaurant chains such as Burger King and McDonald’s.

The meat alternative category has hauled in $957 million in sales for the 52-weeks ended November 2, up 10% year-over-year, according to Nielsen. Within this category, the meatless burger business has seen $272 million in sales, up 11.4% from a year ago.

Brian Sozzi is an editor-at-large and co-anchor of The First Trade at Yahoo Finance. Follow him on Twitter @BrianSozzi

Source: Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods have a new foe in the plant-based burger wars: the Ultimate Burger






 

Categories
Beyond Meat DUNKIN' DONUT Net News TEST PRODUCT REVIEWS

The Story Behind our Beyond Sausage® Sandwich | Dunkin’

CNAP ClipBoard: Sometimes Steve stops at Dunkin’ for early morning coffee. This time he bought two of the new Beyond Sausage Sandwiches for two co-workers to try. They weren’t the vegan ones, since all they have on them is a patty and ketchup. And these guys weren’t vegan.

One of the guys is Egyptian and can’t eat pork, so he was thrilled and loved them.

The other guy, though he didn’t act as excited about it, said he would definitely buy it.

So, those were the reviews of two non-vegans on the Dunkin’ Beyond Sausage Sandwich.


This past August, the Big Apple was offered a new plant-based protein menu option for Dunkin’ guests in Manhattan. To do so, we teamed up with Beyond Meat, one of the fastest growing U.S. food companies offering a portfolio of plant-based meats, to introduce the Beyond Sausage® Sandwich.

This product is part of our commitment to offer our guests a wide range of menu choices to fit their individual lifestyle needs, and our fans LOVE it. We heard from Dunkin’ guests far and wide that they needed this plant based sandwich in a store near them, and we are excited to bring the Beyond Sausage Sandwich to stores nationwide.

In honor of this fan favorite sandwich, we decided to tell the story behind the Beyond Sausage Sandwich.

The Beyond Sausage Sandwich offers the favorite taste and texture millions of Dunkin’ sandwich customers enjoy and expect with a juicy, savory Beyond Breakfast Sausage™ patty – made with 100% plant-based proteins and a mix of spices crafted especially for Dunkin’ – served on an English muffin with egg and American cheese. The taste profile of this plant-based sandwich also pairs perfectly with our Dunkin’ Cold Brew.

In addition to featuring 10 grams of plant-based protein, the Beyond Sausage Sandwich has 29% less total fat, 33% less saturated fat and fewer calories, cholesterol and sodium than a traditional Dunkin’ Sausage, Egg and Cheese Breakfast Sandwich on an English muffin, helping Dunkin’ deliver the nutritional and environmental benefits of plant-based protein.

In honor of Dunkin’ and Beyond Meat’s biggest breakfast news of the year, Dunkin’ is celebrating the launch with its first-ever multi-day sandwich-tasting event. To give people who run on Dunkin’ a chance to experience the great taste of this plant-based sausage offering, on Friday, November 8 and Saturday, November 9 from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. guests at participating Dunkin’ restaurants throughout the U.S. are invited to enjoy a complimentary sample, while supplies last.

If you are new to the plant-based arena, you may have a couple questions about this new Dunkin’ product.

For example, what is a plant-based protein? It is simply that! Protein derived solely from plants. The Beyond Breakfast Sausage featured in the sandwich is made of peas, mung beans, rice and sunflower to provide the protein and coconut oil to ensure juiciness.

You may also be wondering if the new Beyond Sausage Sandwich is vegan. While the standard sandwich build is not vegan, as it includes egg and cheese, guests can order the sandwich with just the Beyond Sausage patty on an English Muffin for a vegan-friendly breakfast sandwich option.

*Sustainability is a key part of Dunkin’s growth, and a critical part of our journey is taking bigger, bolder action to be more sustainable in all the ways we operate. A key benefit of the Beyond Breakfast Sausage patty is that it is more sustainable for the environment than traditional meats as it requires less water, less land, generates fewer Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and requires less energy than a beef burger to produce.

Source: The Story Behind our Beyond Sausage® Sandwich | Dunkin’





Categories
Beyond Meat KFC

Beyond Fried Chicken – A Kentucky Fried Miracle

BEYOND FRIED CHICKEN – A KENTUCKY FRIED MIRACLE

AUGUST 26, 2019

Kentucky Fried Chicken®, the world’s most popular chicken restaurant, has done what no other quick-service restaurant (QSR) has done before. On Tuesday, August 27th, Beyond Fried Chicken™ made its debut in a limited test, crowning KFC as the first U.S. national QSR to introduce plant-based chicken and SOLD OUT in less than 5 hours – a true Kentucky Fried Miracle.  

KFC turned to Beyond Meat to create a finger lickin’ good plant-based fried chicken that would appeal to lovers of both Beyond Meat and KFC. Beyond Fried Chicken is a game changer – the perfect choice for those searching for plant-based meat options on-the-go.

Atlantans had the first taste of Beyond Fried Chicken as part of an exclusive, one restaurant test on August 27 at the Cobb Parkway KFC restaurant near SunTrust Park in Atlanta (2637 Cobb Pkwy South East, Smyrna, Ga.).

Lucky customers could choose between nuggets, perfect for dipping, or boneless wings, tossed in their choice of three delicious mouthwatering sauces: Nashville Hot, Buffalo or Honey BBQ. 

“KFC Beyond Fried Chicken is so delicious, our customers will find it difficult to tell that it’s plant-based,” said Kevin Hochman, president and chief concept officer, KFC U.S. “I think we’ve all heard ‘it tastes like chicken’ – well our customers are going to be amazed and say, ‘it tastes like Kentucky Fried Chicken!’

Customer feedback from the Atlanta test will be considered as KFC evaluates a broader test or potential national rollout. We wanted to give a big THANK YOU to everyone who visited the store and shared the news about the test. It was amazing to see how much enthusiasm there is for The Future of Protein!  In less than 5 hours, not only did they sell out, but guests purchased the amount of Beyond Fried Chicken KFC would normally sell on average of popcorn chicken in a week. Wow.

We will be sure to update all Beyond Meat and KFC fans as we learn more.

Source: Beyond Fried Chicken – A Kentucky Fried Miracle – Beyond Meat – The Future of Protein™






Categories
Beyond Meat Investing

Beyond Meat Stock Price Skyrockets on Its IPO Launch

Beyond Meat Stock Price Skyrockets on Its IPO Launch

The company debuts strong and becomes the first plant-based “meat” company to trade on a major stock exchange.

Danny Vena (TMFLifeIsGood)

May 2, 2019 at 1:28PM

The stock of plant-based meat maker Beyond Meat (NASDAQ:BYND) surged out of the gate on its first day as a public company on Thursday, soaring as much as 150% (no, that’s not a typo) in the minutes after it began trading on the Nasdaq exchange.

The shares, which were priced at $25, opened around 12:18 p.m. EDT at $46 and soared to over $60 in early trading. At current prices, this would value the company at roughly $3 billion.

The writing was on the wall.

Beyond Meat initially planned to price its shares at between $19 and $21 per share, which would have valued the company as high as $1.2 billion. Earlier this week, the company filed an updated S-1 with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), increasing its expectations to a range of $23 and $25 per share. The stock was eventually priced at the high end of its revised range at $25. This was a 25% increase from the midpoint of its original estimates — though apparently not high enough.

Beyond Meat offered 9.625 million shares to the public, up from its original plans of 8.75 million, which valued the company at $1.5 billion. The company will bank just short of $241 million from the offering and plans to use the proceeds to beef up — er, augment — its manufacturing facilities, invest in additional research and development, and bolster its sales and marketing team.

Both the increased appetite for shares and the higher prices they fetched is a sign of the heavy demand from investment banks and other institutional investors, as well as from individual shareholders. Demand was much higher than the company anticipated, as evidenced by the more than doubling of the share price.

Faux burger shortage?

Demand for plant-based meat substitutes has been growing. Beyond Meat said in its regulatory filing that it’s one of the fastest-growing food companies in the U.S. The faux-meat maker has partnered with a growing number of major food chains to offer its plant-based burgers and ground-meat substitute.

Earlier this year, Carl’s Jr. introduced the Beyond Famous Star, a meatless take on one of its flagship burgers, at more than 1,000 locations. Chronic Tacos is also getting into the game, offering Beyond’s ground-meat substitute on any of its tacos, burritos, salads, or nachos. In all, the company sells its plant-based protein to 30,000 retailers, restaurants, and schools in the U.S. and Canada.

Beyond Meat isn’t the only company making headlines for offering meat alternatives. One of the company’s biggest rivals, Impossible Foods, recently made a splash by landing a deal with Burger King to launch the Impossible Whopper at more than 7,000 locations by the end of the year. Impossible Foods notified its distributors of a temporary shortage of its meatless burgers, the result of the increasing interest.

This illustrates the strong demand for healthy alternatives to meat among the general population, which could bode well for Beyond Meat…

FINISH UP: Beyond Meat Stock Price Skyrockets on Its IPO Launch






Categories
Beyond Meat Investing Net News

Where’s the beef? For Impossible Foods it’s in boosting burger sales and raising hundreds of millions

Where’s the beef?

For Impossible Foods it’s in boosting burger sales and raising hundreds of millions

Jonathan Shieber,TechCrunch Tue, Apr 3 5:38 PM EDT

Any company that’s looking to replace the more than 5 billion pounds of ground beef making its way onto tables in the U.S. every year with a meatless substitute is going to need a lot of cash.

It’s a big vision with lots of implications for the world — from climate change and human health to challenging the massive, multi-billion dollar industries that depend on meat — and luckily for Impossible Foods (one of the many companies looking to supplant the meat business globally), the company has managed to attract big-name investors with incredibly deep pockets to fund its meatless mission.

In the seven years since the company raised its first $7 million investment from Khosla Ventures, Impossible Foods has managed to amass another $389 million in financing — most recently in the form of a convertible note from the Singaporean global investment powerhouse Temasek (which is backed by the Singaporean government) and the Chinese investment fund Sailing Capital (a state-owned investment fund backed by the Communist Party-owned Chinese financial services firm, Shanghai International Group).

“Part of the reason why we did this as a convertible note is that we knew we would increase our valuation with the launch of our business,” says David Lee, Impossible Foods chief operating officer. “We closed $114 million in the last 18 months.” The company raised its last equity round of $108 million in September 2015.

Lee declined to comment on the company’s path to profitability, valuation or revenues.

Impossible began selling its meat substitute back in 2016 with a series of launches at some of America’s fanciest restaurants in conjunction with the country’s most celebrated young chefs.David Chang (of Momofuku fame in New York) and Traci Des Jardins of Jardiniére and Chris Cosentino of Cockscomb signed on in San Francisco, as well as Tal Ronnen of Crossroads in Los Angeles.”When we launched a year ago, we were producing out of a pilot facility,” says Impossible co-founder Pat Brown. [Now] we have a full-fledged production facility producing 2.5 million pounds per month at the end of the year.”

The new facility, which opened in Oakland last year, has its work cut out for it. Impossible has plans to expand to Asia this year and is now selling its meat in more than 1,000 restaurants around the U.S.Some would argue that the meat substitute has found its legs in the fast-casual restaurant chains that now dot the country, serving up mass-marketed, higher price point gourmet burgers. Restaurants including FatBurger, Umami Burger, Hopdoddy, The Counter, Gott’s and B Spot — the Midwest burger restaurant owned by Chef Michael Symon — all hawk Impossible’s meat substitute in an increasing array of combinations.

“When we started looking at what Pat and the team at Impossible was doing we saw a perfect fit with the values and mission that Impossible has to drive a stronger mindset around what it is to be conscientious about what is going on,” says Umami Burger chief executive Daniel del Olmo.Since launching their first burger collaboration last year, Umami Burger has sold more than 200,000 Impossible Burgers. “Once people tried the burger they couldn’t believe that it was not meat,” says del Olmo. “They immediately understood that it was a product that they could crave. We are seeing 38 percent increase in traffic leading to 18 percent sales growth [since selling the burger].

“At $13 a pop, the Impossible Umami Burger is impossible for most American families to afford, but pursuing the higher end of the market was always the initial goal for Impossible’s founder, Patrick Brown.

A former Stanford University professor and a serial entrepreneur in the organic food space (try his non-dairy yogurts and cheeses!), Brown is taking the same path that Elon Musk used to bring electric vehicles to the market. If higher-end customers with discerning palates can buy into meatless burgers that taste like burgers, then the spending can subsidize growth (along with a few hundred million from investors) to create economics that will become more favorable as the company scales up to sell its goods at a lower price point.

Brown recognizes that 2.5 million pounds of meat substitute is no match for a 5 billion-pound ground-beef juggernaut, but it is, undeniably, a start. And as long as the company can boost sales for the companies selling its patties, the future looks pretty bright. “To get to scale you have to sell to a higher price-point,” says Brown.That approach was the opposite tack from Beyond Meat, perhaps the only other well-funded competitor for the meatless crown. Beyond Meat is selling through grocery stores like Whole Foods, in addition to partnerships of its…

FINISH READING: Where’s the beef? For Impossible Foods it’s in boosting burger sales and raising hundreds of millions







 

Categories
Beyond Meat BURGER KING Impossible Foods TEST PRODUCT REVIEWS

The Impossible Burger – update

This is one popular burger. Everybody wants it. Even burger joints that sell only animal meat want it. Fortunately for me several locations all at once, near enough so I could get to them, started putting it on their menus.

We ordered it at Earth Bistro in Cleveland, a restaurant that makes everything they serve on the menu vegan-friendly. Can be made vegan.

Probably, but I don’t know for sure, most burger eaters like their burgers medium rare. This was my experience with The Impossible Burger.

Yes, it had a blood taste, but it textured too soft. It seemed barely cooked, barely even warm. In fact the bun was warmer than the burger.

Steve felt like I did. It was okay as far as burgers that bleed go, but he likes his burgers well done. So do I.

When speaking to the owner, he said of course they were still learning to work with it, and that if cooked beyond a certain temperature, it stiffens considerably according to the instructions.

I’m not sure if they actually wasted one by experimenting with it, but you really need to do that.

Firming this burger up, allowing for a longer cook time so when it gets to the customer it is still hot is important.

It wasn’t cohesive enough, and of course it plopped out the sides of the sandwich when I bit into it, more like a chicken salad only made with a burger.

The Impossible Burger is too fragile. Not wanting to lose a burger, cooks are so afraid to go beyond the temperature suggested, that they undercook it. That’s my take on it.

Tighten it up and don’t be afraid to add a little salt.

I won’t order another one until it’s improved. I certainly do appreciate the effort that went into the development of this burger. I look forward to the new and improved IMPOSSIBLE BURGER – maybe a separate one that’s well done. Two varieties: Medium rare – well done.


UPDATE on 7 March 2018

I posted my short review of THE IMPOSSIBLE BURGER onto THE IMPOSSIBLE BURGER Facebook Page. This was there response:

Impossible Foods Thank you for reaching out, Sharon! We’re sorry to hear that your experience didn’t meet your expectations. We’re always working to improve, and we really appreciate your feedback. 👍

If you decide to give the Impossible Burger another go, we’d recommend requesting that it be prepared more well-done. Everyone likes their burgers cooked differently, but we enjoy a medium well preparation of our product.”

My Comment > So, it can be cooked longer than the chef cooked it. Cooks and chefs all over should know this. Like the person from Impossible Foods said, they enjoy a medium-well, which probably is perfect. I will try it again and make my requests and report back. Thank you to IMPOSSIBLE FOODS for clearing that up for me – and anybody else who experienced the same problem.

 






 

Categories
Beyond Meat Net News

The Beyond Burger Hits Bareburger Menus NATIONWIDE

 

Attention all Bareburger lovers: as of today The Beyond Burger will be offered on-menu at all 38 of their locations NATIONWIDE, enabling more consumers to EatWhat You Love™!Replacing the elk and wild boar options on the menu, The Beyond Burger joins the Bareburger menu nationwide, offering consumers even more diverse protein options.

We’re thrilled that Bareburger joins a growing list of national burger-centric restaurants, including BurgerFi and TGI Fridays, carrying The Beyond Burger…

FINISH READING: The Beyond Burger Hits Bareburger Menus NATIONWIDE | Blog | Beyond Meat






 

Categories
Beyond Meat TEST PRODUCT REVIEWS TEST PRODUCTS

BEYOND MEAT BURGER

BEYOND MEAT BURGER 1

BEYOND MEAT BURGER

Now available at select locations. Check out their website: http://beyondmeat.com/.

Steve and I tried this BEYOND MEAT BURGER a few days ago at EARTH BISTRO in Cleveland, Ohio. Although I’m not a fan of the thick burger, preferring them thin, this textured and flavored like a real animal burger – cow burger. The degree of doneness tasted like it looked, done medium.

It was charred slightly so one might think it came off a grill. Satisfied like a burger, maybe two burgers. It was a large meal for me. I couldn’t eat the fries.

The texture of the animal burger is what most people can’t replicate. BEYOND MEAT accomplished that goal. Impressive BEYOND IMPRESSIVE!

EARTH BISTRO provided a vegan bun, vegan bacon, vegan cheese and vegan condiments. Not all who serve a vegan burger do that. Tip of the hat to BEYOND MEAT and to EARTH BISTRO!

BEYOND MEAT BURGER 3






 

Categories
Beyond Meat Net News

Impossible Burger Rolls Out In Universities And Cafeterias

Plant-based burger takeover in 3,2,1! Food technology company Impossible Foods, the makers of the Impossible Burger just recently announced their vegan burger is moving into university, company caf…

Plant-based burger takeover in 3,2,1! Food technology company Impossible Foods, the makers of the Impossible Burger just recently announced their vegan burger is moving into university, company cafeterias, and cultural venues!

The rollout is being coordinated with Bon Appétit Management Company, which run more than 1,000 cafes for universities, corporations, and museums in 33 states, according to FoodDive. Impossible Foods is also working with Restaurant Associates, which operate 160 foodservice locations, such as museums and performing arts centers. The tasty burger is expected to be in retail outlets in the near future, at prices competitive with beef. We can’t wait!

According to Bloomberg, food service represents about half of U.S. ground beef consumption. So for the Impossible Burger, a plant-based “beef” patty that cooks, smells, tastes, and even “bleeds” like real meat to be introduced into the food service arena is a huge step. “For us to have the impact, we have to appeal to meat consumers — and that’s been the target from day one,” Nick Halla, chief strategy officer of Impossible Foods, told Food Dive.

What’s more, the Impossible Burger, like other plant-based meats, is also environmentally superior to conventional burgers. According to the company, their burger uses 99 percent less land, 85 percent less water, and emits 89 percent less greenhouse gas than traditional beef production. Considering the animal agriculture industry is responsible for more greenhouse gas emissions than the entire transportation sector, these are not just impressive statistics, they are characteristics of a product that may just save the planet!

READ ON: The Plant-Based Impossible Burger Is Rolling Out in More Universities and Company Cafeterias! | One Green Planet






 

Categories
Beyond Meat Net News

#BeyondBurger Distribution UPDATE 

#BEYONDBURGER DISTRIBUTION UPDATE

May 31, 2017 | By: Beyond Meat

ICYMI: The Beyond Burger recently launched in the MEAT SECTION at Safeway, and will now be available at more than 280 stores throughout Northern California, Northern Nevada and Hawaii. With this addition of Safeway, the Beyond Burger can now be found at more than 650 grocery stores nationwide!!

Please check to see if your local store is listed below and we recommend to CALL AHEAD to make sure they have Beyond Burgers in-stock. We don’t want anyone leaving empty handed and hungry! …

Finish reading: #BeyondBurger Distribution UPDATE | Blog | Beyond Meat

also> http://beyondmeat.com






 

Categories
Beyond Meat TEST PRODUCTS

BEAST BURGER by Beyond Meat

Cook in a little higher than medium heat with enough oil so they don’t stick.

Fry frozen.

Smells like hamburg cooking.

Textures like ground meat. There’s a ground cartilage texture similar to what you’d experience with a burger made from cow.

Texture dry in center. The light and denser textures were a little too distinct, with the lighter textures in the burger almost being air-like.

Flavor is pretty neutral, almost clean (Kamut grain had that same clean taste – I don’t know what it comes from).

No soy aftertaste.

Did not disappoint? A little.

Cooked on a flame grill would be better and maybe that was the point of the design, to cook on an open grill outside.

You might want to salt and pepper. Needs salt. Bland. But with all the condiments it would work.






 

Categories
Beyond Meat TEST PRODUCT REVIEWS

PRODUCT REVIEW OF FIELD ROAST HAND-FORMED GRAIN BURGERS

 PRODUCT REVIEW OF FIELD ROAST HAND-FORMED GRAIN BURGERS

FIELD ROAST HAND-FORMED BURGER

As plant-based burgers go, Field Roast Hand-Formed Burger is the best of all the burgers I’ve tried. The folks at Field Roast aren’t afraid to use a little fat, which makes the burgers juicy. And that’s what everybody likes about a burger – plant-based or not.