Steve’s Antipasto Soup | Sauce – Today’s Ingredients

No slice no dice. Two hands, a can opener, a pot and a spoon is all you need to make lunches for a week plus a few at-home-meals.

Packed full of flavors, textures and exclamation points – Fly to Italy, Greece, Spain without leaving your kitchen!

Makes 23 cups


Ingredients: Steve waits till all these items are on sale. Use any brand you want, but these are good. Those grilled artichokes are super! If the recipe is too big for your pot, reduce the size (reducing by half works easiest.)

2,28 oz. cans diced tomatoes – Dei Fratelli brand

4 oz. jar chopped Roasted Garlic SPICE WORLD brand

0.42 oz. lightly dried basil by Gourmet Garden


5-3/4 oz. DELALLO MANZANILLA (green) OLIVES, including liquid

6 oz. DELALLO SMALL RIPE (pitted) BLACK OLIVES, including liquid

4.5 oz. jar sliced mushrooms including liquid – Pennsylvania Dutch brand

4.5 oz. jar sliced mushrooms including liquid – POLAR brand

12 oz. jar sweet red roasted pepper strips

2, 7 oz. jars Grilled Artichokes by Napoleon


15.5 oz. can cannellini beans by BUSH’S

16 oz. can garbanzo beans by BUSH’s

15 oz. can whole kernel corn including liquid by FULL CIRCLE


3 c. V-8 Vegetable Juice

12 oz. can tomato paste -I used HUNT’S

salt and pepper to taste


Optional: Top each serving with Follow Your Heart Vegan parmesan shreds.

For some of the meals we cooked up some Veggie Meatballs by Lightlife and served them with the antipasto.

For other meals we served it over cooked elbow macaroni with ridges – RACCONTO brand.


In extra-large soup pot, over medium heat, add all ingredients, except the parmesan and meatballs, stirring after each addition.

Bring to slow boil, then reduce heat and cook for approximately 30 minutes.

Salt and pepper to taste.

If desired, add other seasonings of choice. Steve, for this antipasto, wanted dried Greek oregano, a little brown sugar and a couple dashes of cinnamon.

Pack into microwaveable containers when cool enough.

If desired add 2 vegan meatballs per container, sliced in half and pan-fried till done.

Place the sauce on top of the meatballs. If desired, sprinkle with vegan parmesan.

Then sprinkle with fresh grind black pepper.

Both vegan products (meatball and parmesan) if you decide to use them will definitely wow you. But they are not required in this dish.


Notes: Lucky’s Market on Clifton Blvd. is where Steve primarily shops for the specialty items on sale.

For the non-specialty items he waits till they’re on sale at Sapell’s, Walgreen’s, Giant Eagle, Heinens, Aldi’s, Earth Fare, Whole Foods, probably the same markets you shop at. Everybody always has something on sale.

If you haven’t been to Lucky’s take a ride out. It’s new, different and lots of fun. You can get a pint of beer and 2 slices of pizza for 5$. You can also sip your beer or wine while you shop – low price on both

SLDT, the animal-free chef, at your service






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Pennsylvania Dutchman Mushrooms

Well. I always liked canned and/or jarred mushrooms. To me, they had more mushroom flavor than fresh cooked mushrooms. Just the mushrooms canned with salt brought out the flavor of the mushroom more than oils and garlic and herbs ever did. People who have eaten escargot (snails) claim that without the butter and garlic and wine, they probably wouldn’t like the snail. It was everything they were cooked in that tasted so good.

When I was a kid in Massachusetts in an area where they made great pizza, they didn’t use fresh sliced mushrooms. They used canned, and chopped them coarsely, whereby you could actually experience the mushroom flavor on the pizza – even with all else that covered it. They also used a lot more oil, which also made the pizza juicy.

When the modern pizza was introduced in the early 70’s fresh sliced mushrooms replaced the canned and the oil was essentially eliminated, leaving the pizzas lacking in flavor and juice.

Pizza shops could save some money if they went back to the canned mushrooms. You can’t taste the fresh ones on the pizza anyway, and they don’t have a very long shelf life.

Recently for whatever reason, mushrooms in Cleveland have been way below par in quality and shelf life. It used to be if the tops were all white with no brown spots and they felt firm beneath the plastic wrap, they’d be good in the refrigerator at home for a few days. Not so lately.  For months now, no matter the grocery store, they look good on the top, but when you get them home and unwrap them, the bottoms are squishy and fishy smelling. Those are not useable. Once they get to the fishy stage, no matter what you put them in or do to them, they ruin a dish.

Many restaurants however, still use them as I have experienced many fishy tasting salads when out and about.

No more. If I order a salad I specifically request no mushrooms.

At home I do the same thing. No mushrooms unless they are in a jar or can. My salads can do without mushrooms. Maybe I’ll start marinating some canned mushrooms in a homemade vinaigrette to top off the salad when I have a mushroom craving.

In all other recipes where I would normally use fresh, I’m using canned – unless I’m at a store where I can see the undersides of the mushrooms I’m buying, then give them the smell test. But frankly I’ve been burned so many times of late, I’m not interested anymore in fresh mushrooms.

Steve brought these home the other day to put in a sauce I was making and they worked perfectly. So there.