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Food Processing News

Mizkan Rolls Out Guilt-Free Ragu Pasta Sauce

TAFC Note: What does guilt-free mean? Okay, Mom doesn’t have to feel guilty using a jarred pasta sauce, because the ingredients are “wholesome”. Except of course for the “meat flavored” variety, which doesn’t tell you what kind of animal the sauce is actually flavored with. Regardless of the species or breed there is lots of guilt in that particular jar of Ragu.

Ragu traditionally means ground meat in some version of a tomato sauce, also traditionally used over pasta.

Chunky Marinara, Chunky Garden Vegetable, Flavored With Meat and Traditional are the flavors.

Only one with animal flavor. That’s good news, since most companies offer one animal-free option with all the others containing the animal.

The other good news is that MIZKAN is moving away from the tradition of meat in Ragu sauces. The meat/flesh of the vegetable still qualifies as meat. Now that’s wholesome.

The price is low. Recommended $2.19 for 24 ounces.

I haven’t tried it, since I just got this news today.

Check out their website and store locator.  https://www.ragu.com/our-sauces/ragu-simply/

I did and if they’re right, I should be able to obtain the Simply RAGU at Giant Eagle supermarkets.


Mizkan America Inc. is rolling out Ragu Simply Pasta Sauces. Made with wholesome ingredients, the jarred shelf-stable pasta sauce makes for a quick-and-easy homemade-like meal.

To explore the impact and stress of the busy back-to-school season on weeknight mealtime, the brand team connected with 1,000 moms across America and learned that the majority of moms polled (52 percent) said they feel more stress during this season when compared to the summer.

Additionally, three-out-of-four moms are worried about the ingredients in their children’s diets, including those they don’t recognize, especially added sugar and artificial ingredients.

The new line is designed to ease their concerns, as it is made with California vine-ripened tomatoes, 100 percent olive oil, carrots, onions and other whole-food ingredients and contains no added sugar, artificial colors, artificial flavors or high-fructose corn syrup.

The four varieties are: chunky marinara, chunky garden vegetable, flavored with meat and traditional.

All but the meat variety are Non-GMO Project Verified.

The 24-oz. glass jars have a suggested retail price of $2.19…

FINISH READING: Mizkan Rolls Out Guilt-Free Ragu Pasta Sauce






 

Categories
Food Processing News

Seven CEOs to Watch in Food and Beverage

Seven CEOs to Watch in Food and Beverage

We’ve highlighted seven fairly new CEOs that have taken the helm at food and beverage companies.

By Dave Fusaro, Editor in Chief

Apr 11, 2018

Big Food’s Focus Is Now on Growth, we speak to the rapid changing of the guard that seems to be happening at the top food and beverage companies in the U.S.

Here is an excerpt from that article:

“When all else fails, change your CEO. In the food and beverage industry, chief executives have been dropping like flies lately. CEOs have been replaced at nine of the 24 largest U.S. companies since January 1, 2017. But that’s not the case across business and industry.Across all industries, CEOs average an age of 58 years and tenure of eight years. according to a 2016 study by Korn Ferry International. The executive search firm doesn’t have numbers specific to the food industry, but food CEOS seem to be turning over faster than in other categories, notes John Challenger, CEO of Chicago outplacement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas.While there have been some abrupt leadership changes in the past year or so, Erin Lash, director of consumer equity research at Morningstar Research Services, cautioned that not all the replacements resulted from dissatisfaction with the current course.”

So let the changes begin! Some of the change-agents are profiled below. It will be interesting to see how long they stick around and what changes they can effect on their companies.

Tom Hayes, 52, Tyson Food:

His elevation to CEO on Jan. 1, 2017, was one of the more sudden executive changes and reflects Tyson’s long held desire to be a branded food marketer, not just a slaughterhouse. Hayes was acquired along with Hillshire Brands Co. in 2014, where he had been chief supply chain officer, the same role he had at predecessor Sara Lee. Tyson’s been living a charmed life with protein demand soaring, but what if that stops?

“Probably our biggest thing is we want to actively disrupt ourselves, challenge our business as it is today,” he said in our interview. He’d rather have Tyson do it than have an outside company do it. “That’s why we created Tyson Ventures, to find things that could be disruptive to ourselves.” (Tyson Ventures has invested in vegetarian meat replacement companies, including Memphis Meats, which is developing “cultured meat.”) “

At Tyson, we’re in the middle of a transformation from a chicken company to a broader food company. To do that, we must have agility.”

Steve Oakland, 56, TreeHouse Foods:

No sooner had J.M. Smucker announced his expected retirement than the 35-year Smucker veteran popped up at TreeHouse, where he will be only the second CEO in the latter company’s history. He started March 26. Co-founder and chairman Sam Reed has held that title since TreeHouse’s creation in 2005 At Smucker, Oakland was vice chairman and president of U.S. Food and Beverage. Despite paying a fire sale price, TreeHouse may have bitten off more than it can chew when it acquired Conagra’s private label business. It doubled TreeHouse’s sales but pushed profits into the red.

James Quincey, 52, Coca-Cola Co.

After several stormy years, Coca-Cola Co. replaced CEO Muhtar Kent with COO James Quincey, effective May 1, 2017. Kent remains chairman. A 20-year Coca-Cola veteran, Quincey was being groomed for CEO since being appointed president and COO in August 2015, observers say. Quincey’s a safe bet to protect one of the world’s great brands while gradually righting a likely smaller ship.

Dirk van de Put, 57, Mondelez International:

Mondelez is largely Irene Rosenfeld’s creation and vision, since she carved the global snack company out of Kraft Foods in 2012. Six years later, the company is $10 billion smaller, just as profitable but facing a more uncertain world. Van de Put left the president/CEO job at McCain Foods to replace her as CEO last November. He also replaced her as chairman this March. Can he hasten the new product development pace?

Michele Buck, 56, Hershey Co.

She started her career at Frito-Lay, then spent 17 years at Kraft/General Foods/Nabisco before joining Hershey in 2005 as global chief marketing officer. Buck won a series of promotions until becoming president/CEO in March 2017. She’ll have to steer the company through its annual dilemma of acquiring or being acquired.

Jeff Harmening, 51, General Mills

Harmening joined General Mills in 1994 and led businesses in the U.S. and Europe. He was named CEO on June 1, 2017, and became chairman of the board Jan. 1 of this year, in both cases succeeding Ken Powell. He’s been an architect of the company’s rebuilding already, pushing organics and ecommerce.

Steve Cahillane, 52, Kellogg Co.

Although he immediately came from vitamin company Nature’s Bounty, where he was president/CEO for just over two years, Cahillane spent seven years at Coca-Cola Co., the last as president of Coca-Cola Americas, and earlier worked eight years with AB InBev, mostly InBev…

FINISH READING: Seven CEOs to Watch in Food and Beverage






 

Categories
Food Processing News General Mills Quinoa

General Mills Plans Cheerios Ancient Grains

Will include quinoa, spelt and Kamut, as well as its signature oats.

General Mills Plans Cheerios Ancient Grains

By Dave Fusaro, Editor in Chief

Oct 31, 2014

General Mills Inc. plans to start selling in January a version of Cheerios with quinoa and two wheat varieties, spelt and kamut, as well as its signature oats.

The company made no announcement about the product, to be called Cheerios Ancient Grains, but it carried a Wall Street Journal story on its own website. The Journal quoted Alan Cunningham, marketing manager for innovation in the cereal division, as saying grocery shoppers equate the words “ancient grains” with healthy, simple, nutrient dense food – even if they don’t know exactly what an ancient grain is.

The Journal said the number of foods that use the words “ancient grains” on packaging rose 50 percent this year compared to last, according to a spokesman for General Mills, citing Nielsen data. But the newspaper pointed out Cheerios Ancient Grains is no more nutritious than regular Cheerios.

Research by General Mills showed consumers find the words “ancient grains” more appealing than highlighting a single grain. “It’s not coincidence that this isn’t just Cheerios Plus Quinoa,” says Cunningham.

General Mills started selling another Cheerios spinoff, Cheerios Protein, in June.

READ ON: General Mills Plans Cheerios Ancient Grains






 

Categories
Food Processing News

Food Processing White Papers

White Papers are government or other authoritative reports giving information on an issue.


Avoid Serious Pitfalls when Applying Legal Metrology Rules

Mettler-Toledo
10/10/2017

Clean Label Stabilizer Solutions for Powdered Protein Beverages

TIC Gums
10/10/2017

IPM Pyramid: A Formula for Food Processing Pest Control

IFC
09/28/2017

Industry Briefing: Digitalization In Food & Beverage

Smart Industry
09/13/2017…

Finish Reading: Food Processing White Papers