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FBI to Processors: Call Us in Adulteration Threats

Home / Industry News / 2019 / FBI to Processors: Call Us in Adulteration Threats

FBI to Processors: Call Us in Adulteration Threats

By Pan Demetrakakes, Senior Editor

Mar 27, 2019

The FBI stands ready to help food and beverage processors evaluate and act on adulteration threats, but the industry must be ready to call for help when needed, an FBI analyst said at ProFood Tech.Intelligence analyst Christopher Young gave a presentation on “Food Security and the FBI” at the show at Chicago’s McCormick Place. Young stressed that the FBI is always receptive to processors’ concerns but depends on being approached when a threat occurs.”I need you to make those phone calls, ” he said. “It seems obvious now, but it won’t be when the time comes.

“Young recounted a case where a soft drink processor received a mailed threat of ricin poisoning, purportedly from an employee. He said the FBI looks at these kinds of threats three ways:

Technical feasibility: Can the threat be carried out? In this case, since the packaging in question was twist-off caps, the answer was yes.

Operational feasibility: Can the actor do it? Since it was supposedly an employee, yes.

Adversarial intent: In this case, there was a clear threat. That isn’t always true, Young said.

“We get lots of white-powder letters, and they have some crazy ramblings, but there’s never actually a threat,” Young said.

As it happened, the FBI was able to identify the letter-writer through fingerprints. He was arrested and eventually sentenced to three years of probation and six months of “community confinement.” The company’s losses were limited to $1 million, Young said, although he did not explain that.

Young identified “red lines” that should draw extra attention to an employee, such as a sudden change in personal financial situation, a false or sketchy work history or excessive foreign travel. He also said companies should be willing to extend “lifelines” to employees in some of these situations…

Source: FBI to Processors: Call Us in Adulteration Threats






 

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Food Processing News

Bacardi To Buy Patron Tequila for $5.1 Billion

The global rum giant will pay a premium price to get into increasingly crowded premium tequila market.

By Lauren R. Hartman, Product Development Editor

Jan 23, 2018

Bacardi Ltd., best known for its namesake rum, has reportedly held a 30-percent stake in Patrón Spirits International AG for nearly a decade. Bacardi is now buying the rest, with plans to distribute the Mexican-made liquor more widely and cash in on demand for high-end tequila.

As rivals scramble to own more top-shelf spirits, the company said on Jan. 22 it was hoping to become the second largest spirits company in the U.S. in market share by value. The $5.1-billion purchase is one of the biggest liquor acquisitions in years.

As part of that effort, producers have tried to transform tequila from an inexpensive party drink to a more refined spirit, comparable to a single-malt Scotch.

Patrón, an early entrant in the premium tequila market, is now the industry’s leader, with U.S. sales of $1.6 billion in 2016, according to Euromonitor. But it faces mounting competition from several brands, including ones backed by celebrities such as George Clooney and Justin Timberlake.

U.S. volumes of super-premium tequila jumped more than 700 percent from 2002 to 2016, compared with a 121-percent rise in all tequila volumes over the same period, according to the Distilled Spirits Council.

Based in Schaffhausen, Switzerland, Patrón, produces more than three million cases, or 36 million bottles, each year, while Casamigos was expected to produce about 170,000 cases last year. In addition to its namesake tequila, Patrón owns Pyrat rum and distributes Ultimat vodka.

While Patrón has bottles that sell for $45, others sell for hundreds of dollars, and some limited editions cost thousands. Patrón was founded in 1989 by billionaire John Paul DeJoria, the same entrepreneur who co-founded John Paul Mitchell Systems hair products…

FINISH READING: Bacardi To Buy Patron Tequila for $5.1 Billion






 

Categories
Food Processing News Quinoa

Product Focus: Ancient Grains’ Continued Growth

Food manufacturers have gotten creative with these whole grains, many of which allow for gluten-free product development.

Grains on the Menu 2017After quinoa’s popularity went mainstream in 2013 when the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations declared it to be the International Year of Quinoa, the concept of ancient grains began to resonate with consumers. In response, food manufacturers started getting creative with these whole grains, many of which allow for gluten-free product development.

Ancient grains are defined as grains that have been largely unchanged since the beginning of time. This definition suggests modern varieties of corn, rice and wheat, which are products of years of selective breeding, are not ancient grains, according to The Whole Grain Council. Ancient grains tend to be richer sources of nutrients than modern grains; in particular, richer in fiber and protein, as well as many vitamins and minerals.

Though ancient grains are popular in baked goods and cereals — foods where one expects to find grains — they are also finding their way into meals and side dishes, often in combination with plant proteins, namely pulses, according to Packaged Facts, Rockville, Md. Pulse-based ingredients are particularly valuable in improving the nutrient quality of gluten-free products, many of which are now being made with ancient grains instead of nutrient-void gluten-free staples rice and tapioca flour, as pulses and ancient grains complement each other from nutrition and sensory perspectives.

“For food processors, these ingredients provide whole-food, plant-based protein sources that enhance appearance, deliver unique tastes and textures, pack a nutritional wallop, and invite variety and innovation,” says David Sprinkle, research director at Packaged Facts.

“We know vegetarian and flexitarian dietary patterns are continuing to trend. This is driving the popularity of nutrient-dense ancient grains” ~ Jane Dummer, registered dietitian and author of The Need for Seeds.

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Food Processing News

The Many Faces Of Transparency

FOOD PROCESSING eHANDBOOK

The Many

Faces of Transparency

Trust is the new currency of food & beverage brand loyalty, and the path to trust is transparency.

By Lauren R. Hartman, Product Development Editor

Trust is the new currency of brand loyalty, and the path to trust
is transparency.

That comes from Kira Karapetian, marketing vice president of Label Insight, but it nicely sums up the connections among transpar- ency, trust and success in today’s food & beverage industry.

Transparency is critical if food & beverage companies want consumers to trust their products. But what, today, is transparency? The de nition is evolving and can be di er- ent for almost every consumer.

For many, it means simpler, less pro- cessed ingredients — and certainly not genetically engineered ones, antibiotics, synthetic colors, sweeteners or avors,

nor “questionable” ingredients such as high-fructose corn syrup or brominated vegetable oil. Maybe organic or “free-from” is synonymous. Others want to know where their food comes from and if the producing company is committed to sustainability, humane treatment of animals or charita- ble causes.

“We’re in the midst of a shift in the market- place where the culture and conversation around conventional food, particularly online, is changing as consumers navigate which foods to adopt, moderate or abandon,” says Charlie Arnot, CEO of the Center for Food Integrity, Gladstone, Mo. “The consumer trust model shows communicating with values is three to ve times more important to earning trust than simply communicating facts and science.”…

Finish Reading: FOOD PROCESSING eHANDBOOK