Posted in Investing

The Man Deciding Facebook’s Fate – The New York Times

By Cecilia Kang

March 8, 2019

WASHINGTON — The Federal Trade Commission has no shortage of critics who say it cannot protect Americans from the prying eyes of Big Tech. Instead of forceful action against the likes of Facebook and Google, they say, the F.T.C. leans on a rules that make it hard to impose penalties bigger than rounding errors for the companies.

Those critics have an unusual champion: Joseph J. Simons, the man running the agency.

“We have this over 100-year-old statute that is our main authority,” Mr. Simons said in his first sit-down interview since becoming chairman 10 months ago. “And clearly legislators who approved that were not thinking about data security and privacy issues.

”In the deregulatory era of the Trump administration, Mr. Simons, 60, a Republican lawyer who has jumped between the public and private sectors for more than 30 years, is a rare voice for strengthening the government’s hand.

Mr. Simons has urged Congress to expand the F.T.C.’s privacy-enforcement powers and allow it to impose fines more easily, write new rules and hire more experts. He also says the agency should police how all companies and nonprofits — not just technology companies — collect and handle people’s digital data…

FINISH READING: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/08/technology/ftc-facebook-joseph-simons.html?partner=IFTTT






 

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Posted in Food Processing News

Mars Invests in Kind, Third-Largest Maker of Snack Bars

The minority investment will help both companies grow their product portfolios and allow Kind to expand into new worldwide markets.

Mars, Inc., McLean, Va., known for confectionery brands like M&M’s and Snickers, plans to announce that it will buy a minority stake in Kind, New York, the maker of wildly popular snack bars, according to a report in TheNew York Times.

Kind says it will remain independent and still be led by founder and CEO Daniel Lubetzky. Valued at more than $4 billion, the Kind deal marks a significant valuation for one of the most prominent food brands on store shelves in recent years. The move will likely help both companies develop their product portfolios and allow Kind to expand into new worldwide markets.

“Job No. 1 is taking it global. Job No. 2 is [find out] what other categories either are we already in or we can easily get into that meet the Kind promise?” said Mars CEO Grant Reid.

The minority investment — which could lead to Mars eventually buying all of Kind going forward, based on its history with similar investments — marks the latest effort by a legacy food giant to follow consumers’ healthier eating habits.

Kind has been one of the fastest-growing players in the snack arena, with 2017 sales climbing to $718.9 million, according to Euromonitor. It’s now the third-biggest snack bar maker worldwide by market share, the data provider added, behind General Mill’s Nature Valley brand and the Clif Bar line of energy snacks…

Read On: Mars Invests in Kind, Third-Largest Maker of Snack Bars






 

Posted in Advertising, Investing

Stop Investing In Facebook

You can use the word “cunt” on Facebook to disparage a woman – or a man accused of acting like a woman.

You can’t use the word “nigger” on Facebook to disparage a race of humans.

Yet, you can set a dog on fire, and Facebook – via Mark Zuckerberg – not only allows it to be published, but forces you to view it by granting advertisers the auto-play mode of reception as you scroll your news feed.

Mark Zuckerberg was recruited by the CIA (Central Intelligence Agency) while in college. His system of humiliation of humans and later other animals created a revolution while simultaneously developing a culture of hatred and distrust around the globe among all Peoples.

Stop investing in the CIA. They are a notorious USA and other-single-ethnic-backed terrorist organization whose purpose is to dominate the world through terror – providing fathership to flailing countries that need and/or want a family to dominate them.

Ukraine is currently on the Menu.

https://wordwarriordavies-tight.com/2017/12/06/facebook-mass-incarceration-of-the-collective-mind/






 

Posted in Net News

Organic Farmland: A Short-Term Buy in a Long-Term Trend 

Forget your local farmers market. Organic food is now a big business. And that’s making organic farmland an even bigger opportunity for investors.

America’s growing obsession with organic foods is one of the richest trends in the country. There’s immense investment opportunity – much of it in places most folks would never look.

Organics have grown from a mom-and-pop niche at the local farm market to a billion-dollar cash grab for the “big food” industry.

Most folks don’t know it – because the industrial food giants don’t want you to – but many of the most popular organic brands are now owned by large, multinational conglomerates.

Contrary to the idealistic image in the heads of many shoppers, these homegrown brands are no longer owned by the independent mom working out of her garage. Far from it.

Organics are big business.

As the trend has grown, the big food companies have opened their checkbooks. Nearly every popular organics brand is owned by, dare I say it, an unpopular food giant.

Take a brand as innocent sounding as The Organic Cow of Vermont.

It started small, but eventually was bought by Horizon Organic… which was bought by White Wave (which spun off of Dean Foods)… which was recently bought by the French dairy giant Danone…

Read ON: Organic Farmland: A Short-Term Buy in a Long-Term Trend – Investment U

CNAP COMMENT: You can forget about investing in the organic cow. It is already dead. Going nowhere. They fooled ya. Wanted the world to think all they had to do was stop the antibiotics and feed the cows real food and sing to them as they cut their throats and all would be well in the slaughterhouses again. Okay, call it a field of slaughter if it makes you feel all comfy inside as their blood drips from your own pores.

Nothing can change what it is until it stops. So the sooner you stop investing, the less money you’ll lose long term.

The future is all about plants, not animals. You can take that to Wall Street.