Why The World Needs Plant Meats and Plant Dairy

WHY THE WORLD NEEDS PLANT MEATS AND PLANT DAIRY

Some vegans, especially minimalists, concerned about the carbon footprint believe that the carbon footprint that most researchers agree needs to be reduced may not be accomplished by replacing all animal products with plant alternatives.

That may be so, however in order to convince the largest numbers of people to switch to a plant diet, making some plants taste and texture similar to the animal meat they no longer consume, goes a long way in keeping them satisfied long enough till they actually desire thus choose plant over animal.

I don’t believe that the consumption of plant meats and plant dairy will ever reach the astronomical levels that animal meats and dairy reached globally or even segmentally in individual countries. There will definitely be a tapering off. So keep developing those minimalist animal-free recipes minus the plant meat and dairy. The world needs them as much.

Some analysts predict that the countries with the lowest animal and dairy consumption will actually increase their consumption of animal products, based on the supposition that ‘it’s their turn to prosper in the food category’, using the rabbit or cow in every pot model of abundance.

These analysts think that one needs to go through the same processes as those before them to eventually catch up, which in effect always leaves them behind.

I support wholeheartedly skipping as many steps as possible – maybe all of them – to get all of us on the same page, more or less of course.

Those catch up theories (that take a long time to accomplish) are not proven nor even realistic. Peoples of the world really do like to try new things. They like to copy the behavior of those they hold in esteem or those who have more than they do.

When the high animal and dairy consumers of the world lower their consumption, the only motivation for countries who historically consumed less to consume more will be provided in terms of low costs by the slaughter industries that aren’t willing to jump from a sinking ship.

They will appeal to the base instincts of the human to continue the slaughter. That’s what the tobacco industry did when Americans quit smoking en masse, they opened up foreign markets to a product they knew killed humans.

The motivation for these low consumption countries to stay low and keep eating plants is to provide plant meats and plant dairy that are low cost which possess familiar taste and texture attributes similar to animal and dairy.

One thing these lower animal consuming countries can do now is to invest in plant meat and dairy technology. The problem is that many of these countries spend their time and resources fighting tribal wars, instead of planning and cultivating their future. Do they think that when they need it, some other country will just give it to them?

The field is wide open. There are no limits. No one’s holding them back except themselves.

You can’t get rich tomorrow by doing nothing today.

~ the Word chef






 

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What Does Animal-Free Mean?

ANIMAL-FREE VEGAN COMPANIES ARE STILL IN THEIR BIRTHING STAGE

What this means is that for many companies to get up and running they need to use the factories that other companies use to manufacture their goods that do contain animal products. They basically rent out the facilities, thus the common labeling of possible and/or traces of allergens – among them animal products – on their animal-free vegan goods.

There are very few animal-free vegan companies that build their own factories. Most simply can’t afford the cost. So until such time that the demand for animal-free vegan goods increases to the point where they can stand on their own, I accept that there may be traces of animal products in the animal-free vegan products that I purchase. They can clean the equipment between uses, but it’s nearly impossible to wipe out all traces of what was previously manufactured on the same equipment.

My criterion for animal-free is that the recipe | formula itself contain no animal products.

If my French fries that I order at a restaurant are fried in the same oil that chicken is fried, I will eat the fries. The demand isn’t popular enough for restaurants to have essentially two kitchens – one for animal-free, one for animals. For me to refuse to eat out, doesn’t make any sense, since evolution takes time, and my presence at a restaurant ordering an animal-free dish matters. It shows the chefs, the workers, the patrons that I want to eat there, but I don’t want any animals in my food.

There’s not a magic wand we vegans are going to wave, whereby one day we wake up and all manufacturing companies and restaurants suddenly decide to convert their manufacturing plants and eating establishments to animal-free vegan – and then instantly follow through on it.

Veganism is spreading more rapidly than in the past, still, the way restaurants are currently responding to that trend is by focusing more on vegetarian (including eggs and dairy) than on all vegetable/plant-based.

There’s a Chinese restaurant I go to where the chef makes tofu – to date about eight different ways. Delicious! with many different sauces and combinations of vegetables and fruit. He of course has a full animal-based menu. For me not to eat there because he cooks animals would be counterproductive to the movement. Chefs evolve just like everybody else, and often meet resistance from those who want to hold onto their traditional ways of cooking. If there aren’t enough vegan customers to keep them in business (which there aren’t), all the restaurants will go out of business. And then where will we be?

Then there’s the grocery stores. If I won’t shop at a grocery store that sells meat, I won’t eat, because there aren’t enough of them that are totally vegan.

That will all change, but in the meanwhile I’m going to be part of that change, by supporting animal-free vegan companies that may have traces of animal products in their animal-free vegan goods, because they can’t yet afford to build their own factories, and I will eat at animal-based restaurants that care enough about my business to make me a delicious animal-free meal.

Although we’ve come a long way, we are still in the birthing stage of making our dreams of a cruelty-free planet a reality everywhere. Giving up because we’re not yet there is not an option I give myself.

The animals need us at every stage and juncture of the evolutionary process to free them.

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Did You know That Oreo Cookies Were Vegan?

I still don’t like them. The creamy center isn’t creamy at all. Maybe I’ll give them a try again. I’ll have to be sure to buy some nut milk for dunking.

Later.






 

Labels + Current Diet Categories

Hardly anyone knows what vegan is even today nearly 40 years later. They’ve become familiar with the word, but not the meaning. They don’t get why vegans won’t eat a vegetarian burger made with egg whites, or that fish and chicken are animals. And what’s wrong with cheese? That’s not an animal. Well, real vegans don’t understand why vegetarians won’t eat a burger that contains no animal products. And you have to wonder why a person serving food wouldn’t know where what they serve comes from. Then there’s the added confusion of people calling themselves vegans who eat fish or chicken, or who are strictly animal-free sometimes.

Continue reading “Labels + Current Diet Categories”

SEASNAX

When Steve brought a case of SEASNAX home I doubted that we would finish the case. Well, we have two left after what I had today. The chipotle flavor is my favorite, though I didn’t reject any of them. They’re ultra thin – thinner than spring roll skins and of course crispy. The chew: It’s crispy at first, not crumbly, although it breaks in large pieces. Eventually the crispy chew turns to a semi-wad, a little gelatinous, then chews a little like a steamed clam minus the stomach.

Continue reading “SEASNAX”

The Plant-Based Pitfall

The current trend in labeling a manufactured food, that CONTAINS NO ANIMAL PRODUCTS (CNAP), is to label it PLANT-BASED rather than VEGAN, or ANIMAL-FREE. Some worry about the negativity associated with animal rights groups, so veer from the usage of the word vegan on their product even though it might be vegan.

Continue reading “The Plant-Based Pitfall”

Animal Cruelty Is Not Only About Eating The Flesh

Source The Vegan Activist, YouTube Most vegetarians are not aware that dairy, eggs and honey are cruel and unhealthy products. They have not researched the wool and leather industries and they are ignorant about animal testing. In the following video, I will explain everything as clearly as possible. Help support the channel via Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/theveganactiv… %5B…%5D

via Why Vegetarians Should Go Vegan — Our Compass






 

WHAT CONSTITUTES ANIMAL-FREE TO ME

 ANIMAL-FREE VEGAN COMPANIES ARE STILL IN THEIR BIRTHING STAGE

What this means is that for many companies to get up and running they need to use the factories that other companies use to manufacture their goods that do contain animal products. They basically rent out the facilities, thus the common labeling of possible and/or traces of allergens – among them animal products – on their animal-free vegan goods.

There are very few animal-free vegan companies that build their own factories. Most simply can’t afford the cost. So until such time that the demand for animal-free vegan goods increases to the point where they can stand on their own, I accept that there may be traces of animal products in the animal-free vegan products that I purchase. They can clean the equipment between uses, but it’s nearly impossible to wipe out all traces of what was previously manufactured on the same equipment.

My criterion for animal-free is that the recipe itself contain no animal products.

If my French fries that I order at a restaurant are fried in the same oil that chicken is fried, I will eat the fries. The demand isn’t popular enough for restaurants to have essentially two kitchens – one for animal-free, one for animals. For me to refuse to eat out, doesn’t make any sense, since evolution takes time, and my presence at a restaurant ordering an animal-free dish matters. It shows the chefs, the workers, the patrons that I want to eat there, but I don’t want any animals in my food.

There’s not a magic wand we vegans are going to wave, whereby one day we wake up and all manufacturing companies and restaurants suddenly decide to convert their manufacturing plants and eating establishments to animal-free vegan – and then instantly follow through on it.

Veganism is spreading more rapidly than in the past, still, the way restaurants are currently responding to that trend is by focusing more on vegetarian (including eggs and dairy) than on all vegetable/plant-based.

There’s a Chinese restaurant I go to where the chef makes tofu – to date about eight different ways. Delicious! with many different sauces and combinations of vegetables and fruit. He of course has a full animal-based menu. For me not to eat there because he cooks animals would be counterproductive to the movement. Chefs evolve just like everybody else, and often meet resistance from those who want to hold onto their traditional ways of cooking. If there aren’t enough vegan customers to keep them in business (which there aren’t), all the restaurants will go out of business. And then where will we be?

Then there’s the grocery stores. If I won’t shop at a grocery store that sells meat, I won’t eat, because there aren’t enough of them that are totally vegan.

That will all change, but in the meanwhile I’m going to be part of that change, by supporting animal-free vegan companies that may have traces of animal products in their animal-free vegan goods, because they can’t yet afford to build their own factories, and I will eat at animal-based restaurants that care enough about my business to make me a delicious animal-free meal.

Although we’ve come a long way, we are still in the birthing stage of making our dreams of a cruelty-free planet a reality everywhere. Giving up because we’re not yet there is not an option I give myself.

The animals need us at every stage and juncture of the evolutionary process to free them.